Share the Road

share_the_roadOur roads are intended to be shared by cyclists, motorist and pedestrians too!  And yet, we may not be aware of “the rules” of sharing the road.  KMM has put together a helpful list of the most important tips we should all review before we get behind handlebars or a wheel.

Communicate your intentions

Cyclists, use hand signals consistently.  Motorists, use turn signals in advance of turning to let everyone know your intentions.

Everybody Follows the Same Rules

Cyclists are safer when riding in the same direction as motorists and follow all the same rules as motorists.  Motorists come to a full stop when at a stop sign and do not speed through a yellow light to avoid the wait at a red light.

The Road Looks Different

Cyclists, scan the road ahead to have enough time to signal if you need to move out of the way.  Motorists, sewer grates, broken glass, gravel and puddles are all hazards to cyclists.  Always leave a three-foot buffer in the event a cyclist needs to move out of their lane.

Everybody Wins With Courtesy

Cyclists, the more courtesy you are with motorists, the more courtesy drivers will be.  Motorists, giving cyclists extra respect and consideration creates a safer environment for everyone.

Horns

Cyclists, NJ law requires all bikes be equipped with a horn or bell so that your presence is greatly increased.  Motorists, although the horn is used as a safety tool, it can be dangerous if used in extreme proximity to a cyclist.  A light tap on the horn is sufficient.

Managing Electronic Devices

Both cyclists and motorist, leave the cell phones, iPods and blackberry in your bags and not in your hands as you are driving or riding.  By doing so, you are keeping everyone safe.

And don’t forget, pedestrians have rights too!  Both cyclists and motorists are required by law to yield for pedestrians in crosswalks.  While pedestrians have the responsibility to be visible and predictable when using a crosswalk, cyclists and motorists can observe each others actions when approaching a crosswalk to anticipate a pedestrian using a crosswalk.

For more information, visit www.kmm.org for all your transportation needs.

 

Photo credit: www.thinkbicycles.org

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